Report from the SEARCH Knowledge Exchange Workshop, September 25-29, 2017

The Arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the world, with implications spanning all defining characteristics: sea ice, land ice, permafrost, and cold-adapted communities and ecosystems. The observed changes in the Arctic are resounding, the resulting connections to the globe are increasingly clear, and the science community has an important role to play in supporting action. During September 25-29, 2017, scientists hosted by the Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) spent a week in Washington, DC to focus on communicating the societal implications of Arctic change.

Regional Sea Ice Outlook for the Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort Seas

Regional Sea Ice Outlook for the Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort Seas

Regional ice conditions in the Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort Seas align with general trends toward thinner first-year ice, low to non-existent multi-year ice, and earlier ice retreat. Whether ice retreat in the region will be a key contributor to Arctic wide ice extent values will substantially depend on weather conditions—both the extent of wind-driven ice advection from the region and whether the predominant high pressure system, the Beaufort High, sets up to allow the solar heating of surface waters unencumbered by cloud cover.

The Sea Ice for Walrus Outlook

The Sea Ice for Walrus Outlook

Subsistence hunters and scientists working together to help Alaskan coastal communities adapt to a changing climate

by Lisa Sheffield Guy, Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S.

The Sea Ice for Walrus Outlook (SIWO) provides Alaska Native subsistence walrus hunters and Bering Strait coastal communities with weekly reports on spring sea ice and weather conditions to promote hunter safety, food security, and preservation of cultural heritage.